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KSPCA responding to the case of a painted donkey in Meru

Following the case https://www.standardmedia.co.ke/article/2001255410/man-paints-donkey-with-jubilee-party-colours-and-symbols-to-campaign-for-president-uhuru whereby a donkey in Meru County was painted with Jubilee colours and symbols, The Kenya Society for the Protection and Care of Animals (KSPCA) acted immediately and visited Meru county where we met Mr. Brian Murithi from Buuri constituency who painted a donkey with Jubilee political party’s colors and used for campaigning. KSPCA condemns in the strongest terms possible the incident where a donkey was abused for a political party campaign. This is in contravention of the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act CAP 360 in the following sections:

1. Section 3 (1) (g) willfully, without reasonable cause or excuse, administers any poisonous or injurious drug or substance to an animal or causes any such substance to be taken by an animal; The paint used on the animal is corrosive to the skin and the chemical substances will seep through the skin, into the system and cause diseases to the donkey.

2. Section 10 (1) (a) Prohibition of certain public contests, performances and exhibitions with animals

We helped Mr. Muriithi understand the two above sections and he wrote an apology letter. After KSPCA tried washing the donkey with no success since the paint was sticky, he agreed to take the donkey home and allow the donkey to roll on the ground as they normally do and this will slowly and gently remove the paint with time without injuring the skin.

Therefore, we would like to request all political parties and the Kenyan citizen in general to cease and desist the misuse and abuse of animals for any political gain or civil movement.

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How KSPCA deals with animals in distress

Much of the work at KSPCA deals with animals in distress. Sometimes it is ignorance, sometimes it is lack of empathy. The latter case is where we can have problems. At times we are met with indignation or even aggression from owners when we explain why we are looking at their dogs.

Dogs like people do not like to be confined, it makes them behave badly

Dogs like people do not like to be confined, it makes them behave badly

Unless it is an extreme case as it was with the boerbuls, we give advice and return to make sure that the dog’s living conditions have improved. Mostly with time and patience it has. This is part of the one on one education which is also important.

A case we are working on. Chained up and area not cleaned

A case we are working on. Chained up and area not cleaned

Many owners end up appreciating our advice when they find their dogs are happier and healthier and hopefully they will treat any new dogs that they get in the same way. We also, if the owners agree, have their bitches neutered. Animals, if properly treated give us so much, let us celebrate them and work to make Kenya and the world a better place for them.

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Why Does My Cat… Bite Me When I Pet Her?

It’s a conundrum, for sure. One minute your beloved kitty is over the moon with pleasure as you scratch her favorite spot and the next thing you know you’re left staring at tooth marks on your arm.

You’re not the only one suffering. Many pet owners call this common behavior “Love biting,” but feline behaviorists have given it a more formal name: Petting-induced aggression—and it’s a poorly understood topic.

cat

Typically, a friendly cat seeks out human attention, only to turn on his lavisher of attention once the affection seems to have gone on for too long. Owners describe these cats as changing from friendly to feral “like a light switch.”

Despite the perplexing nature of this uniquely feline way of acting out, a couple of possibilities have been proposed to explain why cats might do this:

  1. It may be a manifestation of so-called status-induced aggression, in which cats seek to control a situation.
  2. There may be some neurologically significant negative stimulus associated with being petted at length that affects these cats in particular.
  3. These cats may be especially subtle at letting humans know when they’re unhappy, so that their change in attitude appears more sudden than it truly is.

Whatever the cause, the good news is that this behavior does not necessarily mean you can’t interact with your cat meaningfully. Your veterinarian can coach you to recognize the very subtle warning signs associated with your cat’s displeasure before it reaches the biting point.

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Cats abandoned by owner at the KSPCA shelter

Sometimes at KSPCA we encounter the darker side of human nature. Recently a man came to our shelter and reported to Fred Atsiaya one of our kennel managers, that he had five cats in his car that he wanted to surrender. Fred said we would take them but we would like a donation from him to help cover costs.

3 of the cats being comforted by one of our volunteers

3 of the cats being comforted by one of our volunteers

The man agreed, walked out to his car, opened the doors threw the cats out and drove off. The cats understandably were terrified and ran off. We managed to catch three of them but unfortunately two have never been found, one of them being the mother of the half grown kittens. How heartless of the owner. Whatever small he would have given we would have taken in the cats.

Mother cat hid on the roof, but ran away and was never caught.

Mother cat hid on the roof, but ran away and was never caught.

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4 Tactics to Curb Unwanted Barking

chihuahua-barking-istock-000003355612Of all dog behaviors, barking may be the most complex. It can be both highly desirable and highly undesirable, depending on your perception or need. Your dog’s barking can help alert you to a need or problem and can provide protection. Barking can also be of use in certain working roles like herding. But uncontrolled barking has the potential to become a major problem with far-reaching consequences for you and your dog.

As natural as barking is, it is one of the most misunderstood and mismanaged canine behaviors. Dog owners frequently assume that a barking dog is defiant or spiteful. Your dog does not bark to get a rise out of you, nor does he instinctively understand what “Quiet!” means. To address barking, we first need to understand why dogs bark.

Why Dogs Bark

Barking is a natural release for your dog’s emotions, as well as a way to communicate with other dogs, other animals and people.

Your dog may bark for a variety of reasons. He may bark to express frustration or excitement, or to ask for attention or invite another dog to come play. Barking can also be a warning that something is wrong or that a dog is preparing to aggress or bite. And some dogs bark simply because they are bored or enjoy barking.

The context and intensity of the dog’s emotion may influence the bark. Not all barks have the same meaning, and individual dogs may bark for different reasons in the same situation. I worked with two Cocker Spaniels who both barked at visitors: One barked primarily out of fear and anxiety, using her barks to warn new people to keep their distance, while the other barked in joyous excitement, begging new people to notice her and pet and play with her.

It is possible to change your dog’s barking behavior, but if you suspect that fear, anxiety or aggression is the reason for the barking, it is important that you seek professional help for your dog. Talk with your veterinarian about a referral to a reward-based trainer or veterinary behaviorist who can help with the barking.

End Unwanted Barking

If a dog is inadvertently rewarded for barking, the pattern becomes further ingrained. So if your dog barks each time the doorbell rings and you distract him with a treat, he learns that barking at the doorbell earns him a snack, and he will continue to bark when he hears the sound.

So how can you put a stop to unwanted barking? Here are a few of my favorite strategies.

Ignore the barking. In situations where your dog wants something you can control — a walk, a toy or your attention — ignoring the bark and rewarding quiet behavior may be effective. Practice throwing the ball only when your dog’s mouth is closed, for example, not when he’s barking at you. Ignoring the bark won’t work in every situation, though; if your dog’s barking is being reinforced by natural consequences (he barks at the mail carrier, who turns and walks away), then ignoring it will have no effect. If your dog is upset or frightened, the bark is only a symptom of the underlying issue, and ignoring it may make the situation worse.

Teach “quiet. ” Your dog does not intuitively understand the “quiet” cue. Punishing him as a way to stop the barking may further agitate him, and yelling at him may lead him to think that you are barking with him. Help put a stop to barking by teaching your dog to speak, and then teaching him “quiet.” Heavily rewarding the quiet behavior reinforces it and makes it easier to change his behavior when he begins to bark.

Limit barking opportunities. The most effective way to put a stop to unwanted barking is to prevent the behavior in the first place. If your dog barks at people he sees through the window, close the blinds or restrict access to rooms or areas where he can see outside. If your dog barks when he is alone outside, supervise him when he potties and reward him for doing his business without barking. If he barks at people he sees on his walk, teach him an alternative behavior, like touching your hand with his nose. Reinforce the alternative behavior with a desirable reward.

Interrupt and redirect. When your dog begins to bark, get his attention with a small noise and ask him to do something else. The interruption should be enough to just break his focus without scaring him — for example, a cluck of the tongue, a kissing sound or a quiet clap. Once you have your dog’s attention, tell him what you want him to do — sit, go to his mat, down — and reward this alternative behavior.

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When you see what this hungry dog did to a new born baby you will be shocked

There is a good chance that this post will be the most disturbing one that you will see all day. There is also a chance that this will be the most inspirational thing that you will see all day. Viewer discretion is advised and those who have weak stomachs and cannot handle graphic images are urged to direct their attention elsewhere.

Most of us are already well aware of the fact that we share this planet with cruel people that have zero regard far anyone but themselves. Lots of people will take life away from another person, just so that they can be comfortable.
Look all of he abandonment that takes place in our society. people will dispose of their pets if they don’t want to clean up after a mess that they’ve made. Others may get rid of a dog or cat, just because they are defective and not as cute as other animals.

While some people are cruel to stray dogs, this post shows just how dignified they can be. A stray dog was wandering the streets in search of food. The dog found a newborn baby that had been carelessly thrown away. The child still had their umbilical cord attached and looked to be a few hours old.

Even though the dog was very hungry, he did not eat the newborn child. He took the baby out of the street, with the goal of finding them a loving home. The pup took the baby to the nearest home and began to bark for attention.

The family inside of the home heard the dog’s frantic bark and came outside to find quite a startling discovery. They brought the child to the hospital and thanks to this dog’s selfless actions, the baby remains alive today. The parents of this child were incredibly stupid to dump a baby in the trash and without the heroic actions of this dog, the child would have perished before it had a chance to live.

The dog is a hero and deserves to be treated as such. He showed the world that a stray dog does not need to be considered a second class citizen. He showed more heart than the child’s gut less parents and provided an innocent baby with a much needed second chance.

This post is amazing and astonishing and deserves to be shared with all of your friends.

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If you find you pet doing this, take them to the vet immediately

If you have a pet, then you have probably laughed at some of their antics, while wanting to shake your head at some of the other stunts they’ve pulled. While a pet may press their head into a wall to let you know that they are guilty of eating their sibling’s food, it can also be a sign that they need medical attention immediately.

When the head pressing becomes common, this is a sign of a much deeper issue. A pet that is seen pressing their head into a wall, without a good reason for doing so, could be suffering from damage to their nervous system. There are a number of reasons why their nervous system could be failing them, including infections and tumors.

Pets pressing their heads into a wall is often cute to watch, but could be the symptom of a much larger issue. Pets cannot speak to us know when they are suffering from internal pain and unless we heed these warning signs, our pets’ health and even their lives could be endangered.

Their actions let you know that they need help and pet owners are urged to act quickly in these situations. The severity of their condition depends on the frequency of the head pressing, as well as the amount of time that they spend on the activity.

Getting them medical treatment is important, since the head pressing may indicate that the animal is in need of hospitalization. The vets will be able to determine what kind of ailment your animal is suffering with and provide them with the help they need to keep living a happy, healthy life.

Pets don’t speak the English language and they have no other method for alerting you to their pain. If your pet is repeatedly pressing their head into a wall, this is not the time to laugh and take photos for social media. Get your pet the medical help that they need as soon as possible. If it were possible, you know that they would do the same for you.

Do you know anyone out there who has a pet of their own? Then be sure to share with them, so that they can provide their animal with the help that they need. Who knows? You just might end up saving a life and being considered a hero by your friends and loved ones.

Possible things going on:
Liver shunt
Stroke
Brain tumor
Toxic poisoning
Head trauma
Infection of nervous system
Metabolic disorder
Hydrocephalus – water on the brain
Infectious types of meningitis
Other strange behavior to watch for
Walking in circles (different than chasing tail in play)
Pacing constantly not out of boredom
Blankly staring at wall
Pushing face in ground and rubbing
Seizures
Signs of liver disease – jaundice, increased urination , weight loss, lethargy
Problems with vision
Reflexes off

Please share this message with them. Together, let’s keep our pets happy, healthy and forever smiling.

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10 Life Lessons Owning a Pet Can Teach Your Child

Your child can learn much from owning a pet, including these 10 valuable life lessons.

10 Life Lessons Owning a Pet Can Teach Your Child

  1. Responsibility: Pets require daily feeding, exercise, and affection, not to mention grooming and clean-up. Older children can learn how to care for another living creature and even younger children can help with feeding and playtime.
  2. Trust: It’s easy to spill your heart out to your pet, who will offer you unconditional support in return. Pets make wonderful trusted companions for children and can be a first step to helping your child build trust in other relationships, too.
  3. Compassion: Caring for a pet requires compassion, understanding, and empathy. Kids learn to be kind and to take care of others’ basic needs.
  4. Bereavement: When a pet passes away, your child will inevitably feel the pain of the loss, but in turn will learn how to cope during the bereavement period.
  5. Respect: Owning a pet teaches children how to respect others. They must touch them gently, tend to their needs, and learn not to disturb them when they’re eating or sleeping.
  6. Self-Esteem: Pets show unconditional love, which can be a great boost to a child’s self-esteem. So, too, can the satisfaction that comes from having responsibility and caring for a pet’s needs.
  7. Loyalty: A pet’s loyalty toward its owner is often unmatched. In turn, children learn the importance of showing loyalty to their devoted furry friend.
  8. Physical Activity: Children who own a dog learn how fun physical activity can be while they play tug-of-war, fetch, or go for walks with their pet. Research shows, in fact, that children in dog-owning families spend more time being physically active than children without dogs.
  9. Patience: Bonding with a new pet often takes time. Your child will learn patience while your new pet becomes comfortable in your home and also during training.
  10. Social Skills: Dogs can be an amazing social “ice breaker.” Taking your dog for walks as a family can improve your child’s social skills as you interact with others. Pets may also help children with autism to develop social skills such as sharing.

There are many other benefits as well. Your child can have her basic emotional and physical needs fulfilled by a pet, including comforting contact, love, and affection.

Research also shows that children from dog-owning homes (during their first year of life) have fewer ear infections and respiratory tract infections, and require fewer antibiotics, perhaps because the exposure stimulates the immune system.

Other noted benefits include a significantly reduced risk of allergies and even better grades at school, presumably because owning a pet seems to give kids greater motivation.

Is Your Child Ready for a Pet?

Very young children shouldn’t be expected to care for pets without assistance. They can help, of course, but if your child is under 5 you can assume that you’ll be doing most of the pet care. Further, it’s difficult for very young children to understand how to gently handle a pet, which is why they’re often overly rough and may injure an animal – or become injured themselves if the pet retaliates.

Children under the age of 3-4 should be monitored with pets at all times, and even children under 10 should not be expected to care for a dog or cat completely on their own.

If your older child expresses the desire for a pet, it’s a good time to have a talk about responsibility and the permanency of owning a pet. Be sure your child has expressed a consistent desire for a pet (not simply a passing mention) and understands that it will require daily care (work) and not just playtime.

It’s a good idea to set up expectations ahead of time for what pet-care responsibilities your child will need to fulfill. Discuss these with your child and agree upon them together.

That being said, even if your child commits to the responsibility, only add a pet to your family if you are prepared to take over their care if your child does not. If you decide your child is ready for a pet, resist the urge to give her one as a surprise. Instead, involve your child in each step of the process, including selecting the right pet for your family.

Find pets available for adoption here

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Why Does My Cat… Bite Me When I Pet Her?

It’s a conundrum, for sure. One minute your beloved kitty is over the moon with pleasure as you scratch her favorite spot and the next thing you know you’re left staring at tooth marks on your arm.

You’re not the only one suffering. Many pet owners call this common behavior “Love biting,” but feline behaviorists have given it a more formal name: Petting-induced aggression—and it’s a poorly understood topic.

Typically, a friendly cat seeks out human attention, only to turn on his lavisher of attention once the affection seems to have gone on for too long. Owners describe these cats as changing from friendly to feral “like a light switch.”

Despite the perplexing nature of this uniquely feline way of acting out, a couple of possibilities have been proposed to explain why cats might do this:

  1. It may be a manifestation of so-called status-induced aggression, in which cats seek to control a situation.
  2. There may be some neurologically significant negative stimulus associated with being petted at length that affects these cats in particular.
  3. These cats may be especially subtle at letting humans know when they’re unhappy, so that their change in attitude appears more sudden than it truly is.

Whatever the cause, the good news is that this behavior does not necessarily mean you can’t interact with your cat meaningfully.